Most Dangerous Jobs in the World

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Millions of people in the world often have to risk their lives everyday protecting us, fighting for us and helping us when we are hurt or injured. To be specific, according to the AFL-CIO data, occupational injuries claim the 15 fatalities each day, and the following jobs are considered the most dangerous ones in the world:

 


1. Pilots and airline employees

 

The number of fatalities for airline employees was extremely high in 2006 due to an August 2006 Comair crash in Lexington, Kentucky, which caused 47 deaths including the pilot and multiple passengers. However, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 215 airline-related fatalities all together with 44 accidents related to multiple deaths.

 

2006 Comair crash in Lexington, Kentucky

2006 Comair crash in Lexington, Kentucky

 

2. Fishermen

 

Men and women who work in the fishing industry often put their lives at risk because they have to battle forces of nature including strong storms and extreme temperatures. Moreover, with a higher death rate of 86.4 deaths per 100,000 workers, fishing is listed in the most dangerous jobs in America

 

Fishermen is battling with storm

Fishermen is battling with storm

 


3. Structural construction workers

 


The United Steelworkers union reports that deaths among structural construction workers are increasing as owners and managers try to cut costs. Besides that, the most common cause of death among them can be resulted from falling according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

A construction worker is building a high building

A construction worker is building a high building

 

4. Loggers

 

People who work in the logging industry have to be faced with the expected dangers related to cutting down giant trees. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA), one of the most dangerous situations is a lodged or hung tree, which happens when a cut tree does not fall all the way to the ground but gets caught against another tree. AS a result, a recent repost indicates that timber industry can result in 92.4 deaths per 100,000 reported in 2006.

 

A logger without safe working equipment

A logger without safe working equipment

 

5. Power-line technicians

 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 350 workers including those who install or repair lines are killed annually due to contact with electric currents or power lines. Meanwhile, other incidents have been caused by employees who fell while working on power lines high above the ground. Consequently, fatalities have risen recently among electricians.



Two electricians are working at the high altitude

Two electricians are working at the high altitude

 

An electrician is contacting high voltage current

An electrician is contacting high voltage current

 

6. Waste management employees

 

Because waste and recycling collectors often drive the trucks, their biggest threat involves road and highway crashes. Moreover, the frequency of contact with hazardous wastes is an additional risk.

 

An employee is collecting wastes
 

An employee is collecting wastes


A woman is directly working with daily wastes

A woman is directly working with daily wastes

 

7. Roofers

 

According to the recent statistics, fatal falls from roofs increased by 15 percent between 2005 and 2006. In addition, such alls from ladders, scaffolding, and other places were the second most common cause of worker fatalities, after driving accidents.

 

Roofers without unsafe device

Roofers without unsafe device

 

Related links: 

1. Roofers without unsafe device

2. More Dangerous Professions Could Account for Wage Differences

3. Jobs

4. Tips to Find a New Job

 

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Lee Dobbins has 433 articles online and 7 fans

Leland Mason is a premier job search Web site and career planning. He has been around the business world for many years and has a good understanding about generating an income.

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Most Dangerous Jobs in the World

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This article was published on 2010/03/01